Posted in | 0 comments



AVAILABLE WORK.
CONTACT WITH US FOR + INFO

Let the JOKOA party begin… No one here knows exactly how it will end…

This is the fourth piece of the young Parasite Collective and it offers up an invitation to play a game which rapidly turns into a party, and from a fragile party slides into intimately revealing scene involving the party hosts. These four women who seem to be in charge of the rule book appear to be pawns in a larger game at play. The live DJ-set steadily and confidently guides the audience in this enthralling descent.

JOKOA seeks to question the expectations the audience bring to the theatre with them. The question at the heart of it all is “what do we think people think of us?” Part hedonistic party, part lucid drunken melancholy, this performance proposes the audience considers their role and part in it.

Premieres on the 16th of Novembrer 2017 in the Sala Baratza of Vitoria-Gasteiz.
Performed in Spanish, English and Basque.



CREATION PROCESS

Parasite Collective began investigating the theme at the heart of this piece at the start of 2017. “What we think people think of us” has been the question underlying the collective´s research since then. From a personal to a societal level, what effect do our hypothetical interpretations of the opinion/judgement of others have on us? Is it cultural, hereditary, desirable, avoidable?

The creation process with the JOKOA team began in May 2017. Parasite tends to approach the theme of their shows through questions. Questions that lead to the generation of text, image or songs. They also serve as a stimulus for improvisations of a physical nature. As a result, the material that emerges from this mode of work has a very physical and moving component. The language thus constructed acquires a code of communication somewhat abstract, sensorial and non-linear. The result is a visual and emotional communication that speaks more to the body rather than the head. Parasite does not attempt to provide answers but instead to provoke reactions and awaken sensations in the spectator to instigate his or her own questions.